What does "Champion" by Fall Out Boy mean?

I've honestly not been that big a fan of Fall Out Boy in the past, but I do love how they give something deeper in their lyrics. They give us a meaning, and they often use allusions or pop culture references that add a layer of complexity to their lyrics. This depth is probably the reason that you're here after Googling something like "champion lyrics meaning Fall Out Boy." I knew you'd be here, so I've explained the lyrics below in an attempt to help you better understand and connect with the lyrics of this band that we both respect. 

What does "Creature Comfort" by Arcade Fire mean?

I've never really listened to Arcade Fire until recently, and I still hadn't explained any song but "I Give You the Power" until now, but I've got an old work associate who every time I see him asks if I'm going to start explaining Arcade Fire. And I honestly wasn't enthused about the idea. They aren't as popular as the bands I usually review, and I didn't know what to make of them.

What does "Hard Feelings/Loveless" by Lorde mean?

I really, really like the sound of "Hard Feelings/Loveless," and before we go any further, you should know that this song is two songs stuck together. There's an understated musical transition between the two, but they really are two different songs or two different stages in the action of the story being told here. In "Hard Feelings," we hear Lorde singing softly and reasonably, almost begging for the emotional turmoil of a breakup to treat her gently, but then in "Loveless," it all becomes too real, and she lets herself sound bitter and bratty almost, sort of a satire on heartbroken, bitter pop songs about exes. 

What does "Writer in the Dark" by Lorde mean?

This has to be one of the deeper and more maturely beautiful songs on Melodrama. In this song, Lorde accentuates the emotion she can command with her voice, and the instrumentation complements her voice and her intended lyrical meaning perfectly. The instruments are largely confined to a plain piano and background strings nearer the end, but they serve as the perfect complement in a beautiful song.

What does "All I Can Think about Is You" by Coldplay mean?

"All I Can Think about Is You" by Coldplay is a slow, soft, sweet song with one main message: the same message that the title so clearly lays out. All that Chris Martin's narrator can think about is someone he's romantically interested in. Musically, the song is very impressive, it feels like it travels over several different soundscapes and backgrounds as Martin feels out the different ideas and sentiments that the lyrics are built on. 

What does "Sober II (Melodrama)" by Lorde mean?

This song is one of the eeriest and saddest from Lorde's new Melodrama record. "Sober II" includes some interesting and eerie vocal gymnastics and a paired down but powerful sounding instrumental background. I think it gets most powerful when the drumbeat kicks in over Lorde saying things like "They’ll talk about us, all the lovers / How we kiss and kill each other." The intensity here is certainly a quiet, understated one, but it may be present on the album no more anywhere than here on "Sober II."

What does "Supercut" by Lorde mean?

Lorde's new album Melodrama is here, and it's fantastic. The songs on it have more of an acoustic, dry sound than the dark, heavy sound of Pure Heroine, but that doesn't keep songs like "Supercut" from being absolutely mesmerizing. In fact, the dry, clear sound brings the lyrics to the forefront as Lorde works through and seeks to understand a new young adult stage in her life that was the natural sequel to her ode to teenager-hood in Pure Heroine. 

What does "Walking the Wire" by Imagine Dragons mean?

Imagine Dragons' new single "Walking the Wire" sounds strangely inspiring and anthemic compared to their last few singles, "Whatever It Takes," "Believer," and "Thunder." Those songs have been about personal empowerment or difficult truths, but "Walking the Wire" feels like it could be a heartfelt 80's ballad or the theme song to the moment in Titanic when Jack and Rose are standing at the front of the ship. Because "Walking the Wire" feels so strangely uplifting, it almost doesn't match the other songs released, especially when the dramatic guitar kicks in near the end. But it's obviously still an Imagine Dragons song. Dan Reynolds's unique voice and ability to beautifully yell each lyric with so much passion, plus a uniquely Imagine Dragons drum beat gives it their unique sound.

What does "The Louvre" by Lorde mean?

Lorde just dropped her Melodrama album, and it's awesome. Unlike Pure Heroine, romantic relationships figure heavily into the lyrical content, but the songs are very good and full of interesting metaphors and unique perspectives on topics some would have thought over-mined. Lorde surprises us with her ability to be fresh when writing pop music. And I think it's largely thanks to her ability to write such tangible, interesting lyrics that make us think more deeply.

What does "Homemade Dynamite" by Lorde mean?

The most impressive aspect of "Homemade Dynamite" is Lorde's ability to skillfully meld pop and alternative/indie aesthetics. The song has all the sass a pop queen could ask for, but some of the instruments in the background--particularly a whistle/synth/keyboard sound--give it a distinctly unique and eclectic vibe that doesn't take away from the vivacity of what she's saying. It's a unique song, but let's get into the lyrics.

What does "Sober" by Lorde mean?

I think "Sober" may be one of the more artsy tracks on Melodrama so far. The song isn't very similar to Pure Heroine musicallybut it is interesting and seems to be following the stripped back vocals, chorused background vocals, and simple beat formula that many of the other songs are following. I do like the sound of it even if I couldn't have predicted it after Pure Heroine, and I'd love to know what you think about it too!

What does "2U" by David Guetta ft. Justin Bieber mean?

"2U" by David Guetta and featuring Justin Bieber is certainly an interesting sound, but mostly because it seems to be a combination of two sounds. You have Justin Bieber's vocals with what sounds like an early 2010's techno beat. The smooth, steadiness of his voice combined with the wide-ranging effects of the beat and instrumentals creates a sound that seems like it's always in flux, never quite ready to settle down. That nervousness gives the song energy and makes for what could very well be another chart topper. Bieber has been doing quite well as a featured guest recently on "I'm the One" and "Despacito," and "2U" might continue the trend.

What does "Witness" by Katy Perry mean?

I don't know about you, but I've been excited for Katy Perry's new album for quite a while. I'm not a superfan of many female pop stars (or male pop stars for that matter). I prefer homegrown, sincere lyrics that the artists write themselves and that they truly mean. But something grabbed my attention about this new Witness album. I think it was on Twitter, but Katy Perry claimed that this songwriting era of hers was going to be more politically and socially minded. "Chained to the Rhythm" clearly followed that blueprint, but "Swish Swish" (a swagger track) and "Bon Appetit" (a shallow pop sex track) both seemed to contradict her new motivation. 

What does "Perfect Places" by Lorde mean?

Lorde's new album Melodrama comes out in one week, and "Perfect Places" seems to be the song most like Pure Heroine that I've heard so far. The music is synthy and deep, but it differs from Pure Heroine by sounding lighter and less dark. There's just something below the surface of the music--maybe something in her voice--that speaks of being happier. Or maybe it's how she sings the line "I'm nineteen, and I'm on fire." Whatever that quality is, "Perfect Places" might be my favorite song from Melodrama so far. It's Lorde, but it's older, happier Lorde, and I like who she's becoming.

Podcast: Is "Something Just Like This" by Coldplay & The Chainsmokers Deep or No Deep?

"Something Just Like This" is hovering at number eight on the charts right now. It's popular because it's the work of two very different bands, and it's bringing those fans together. "Coldplay" (or particularly Chris Martin in this case) and The Chainsmokers have created a unique something here. The music sounds like The Chainsmokers, and the lyrics sound like a slightly less deep but still sweet Coldplay. In this episode, I explain every line of the song and explain how allusion plays into all of this, and I wonder at what another word for a "gaggle of gods" is. You'll see later. We also talk about the superhero mythos.

Podcast: My "Heathens" Explanation Was WRONG!!?? New PROOF!

So, when "Heathens" first came out, I put out a couple of blog posts explaining the lyrics. My first one explained that "Heathens" was largely about the Skeleton Clique and letting in outsiders, but my second one retracted that and said that "Heathens" was about Christian witnessing and what it meant to share your faith as a quick fix for people with real troubles. I still really like that explanation, and it fit in really well with Twenty One Pilots songs like "Clear," but I've just gotten new evidence that I HAD to share with you guys. In a radio interview, Tyler Joseph gives the TRUE meaning of "Heathens," and I have a lot to say about it.

Podcast: "Thunder" by Imagine Dragons: Why is it so weird sounding? And the MUSIC VIDEO!?

Imagine Dragons is working up to releasing their new album Evolve, and "Thunder" has got to be the most eclectic popular song I've heard all year. Seriously though. This song is fantastic, but in this podcast we're going to expose it for just how fantastic it is. Is it about epic conquest? Is it about deeper questions in life? Is it about Dan Reynolds's life? Yes, to all three! But we'll see how and more soon! Plus, we'll be looking at how the music, music video, and lyrics compliment each other perfectly.